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if we go over the fiscal cliff and it's starved of billions of dollars in contracts or are massive job cuts unavoidable and on the horizon? then that millionaire next door, he may no longer be a millionaire, or she f we go over the fiscal cliff. our wealth editor robert frank tal lis up the casualties coming up. you're watching "closing bell" on cnbc. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. a passionate belief, and the foundation on which merrill lynch has been built. today, our financial advisors lead from a new position of strength. together with bank of america, they have access to more resources than ever before. a steadfast commitment to help you achieve your financial goals in life. that's the power of the right advisor. that's merrill lynch. >>> who doesn't want a special dividend? the hits keep coming. oracle a
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
stick points over the fiscal cliff debate is whether to cut entitlements. dean baker says that's not the reason for our deficit problems. so they should not be on the table right now. we also have j.d. foster of the heritage foundation who says mr. baker's numbers don't add up. good to see you, gentlemen. thanks for joining us. dean, make the case. >> well wit, it's very simple. if you look at projections, we had low-budget deficits, 1.2% gdp until the economy collapsed the housing bubble. the reason why we have large budget deficits today is pure and simple. the economy collapsed and the deficits are what's supporting demand. why are we suddenly running around like chickens with our heads cut off to cut social security and medicare when those programs are needed more than ever? >> so you think we should keep spending on those programs? >> i think we need to protect retirees. they took a big hit when their house prices collapsed to then turn around and whack them again by taking away their social security and medicare doesn't make sense. >> i'm going to come back to that. j.d.,
the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect in an agreement that doesn't involve the rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. all those americans get a tax cut under the framework under the first $250,000 of their income. in some sense, it's a tax cut for all americans. it's just for people who make more than that, we're going to ask them to pay a modestly amount more. >> that's hard to understand given how much going over the fiscal cliff would hurt the economy. why is going over the fiscal cliff worth it for just this one component? if you can get the other components, why wouldn't you take that? >> good question. thanks for asking. what we're trying to do is put in place a comprehensive balance set of fiscal reforms that put us back on the path to living within our means and create room for investing to make the economy stronger, make sure we're protecting medicare for future generations, and forcing the government to use the taxpayers' resources more wisely. in that context, you have to have a significant amount of revenues. we don't see a way of doing
fiscal cliff drove markets and drove sentiment. as you know, at year end, the bush tax cuts will expire, triggering the biggest tax increase since world war ii for virtually all income levels. along with those tax increases will come reckless and blunt spendin spending cuts that will lead to mass layoffs while pushing the economy back into a deep recession in 2013. thun of these issues, of course, are a surprise to anybody. washington set this deadline for itself a long time ago. yet, here we are once again. a month and a day away from a self-inflicted disaster. and both sides scrambling for a deal? no, not at all. instead, what we heard today was both sides scrambling to point the finger. listen to this. >> now is the time for the republicans to move past this happy talk about revenues, ill-defined, of course, and put specifics on the table. the president has made his proposal. we need a proposal from them. >> what we don't know is what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. >> so i ask, where is the leadership from our elected "leaders"? i'm not
to go over the fiscal cliff. there will be some sort of resolution. they'll come up with some tax cuts, some breaks in spending, and probably kick the can down the road on a lot of it. i love the way this market is acting. it's not selling off with all the bad news, all the bickering, all the bad words on each side. you've got to love the way that this market is holding up here. doesn't mean investors need to be carefree, but overall, it looks like the market is setting up with a lot of negative sentiment out there. looks like there's a lot of opportunity for a big run higher once we get some form of resolution. i really believe we're going to get it. >> you think by year end? >> i really do. i think they want to go home for christmas. they're not going to want to not go home for christmas. you can always count on politicians to do the right thing when all other options have been exploited. they're going to finally get there because they have to. they're not going to solve 100% of it right away. >> jump in, abbigail. >> i think it's too early to be bearish or bullish, for that matter.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6